Project Twist-It

telling our stories

We all love stories. Stories can help us understand the world - and each other - a little better. Project Twist-It is a hub for stories often hidden from view. We are sharing these stories through original writing, film, audio, animation and much more.

Changing the way we talk about poverty

 Created for Project Twist-It By  Shane Pangburn

Created for Project Twist-It By Shane Pangburn

People with experience of poverty feel their stories and viewpoints are not heard - or are misrepresented. Together, we can change that. Find out more about this groundbreaking project at our About Page.

Natasha Carthew book.png

Natasha Carthew is a working-class country writer from Cornwall, UK, where she lives with her girlfriend. She has written two books of poetry, as well as three novels for young adults, Winter Damage, The Light That Gets Lost and Only the Ocean, all for Bloomsbury. Her first novel for adults, All Rivers Run Free, is published by Riverrun/ Quercus. Natasha has written for many publications, including the Writers' & Artists' Yearbook, Eco-fiction, TripFiction, the Guardian, the Big Issue and the Dark Mountain Project. She’s currently writing her second literary novel for adults and a new collection of rural poetry. She is also the organiser and Artistic Director for The Working Class Writers Festival which will tour the UK in 2020.

Mahsuda Snaith is an award-winning novelist who writes from experience about working class life and growing up in a low-income community. She has made this short film - with exclusive book extract reading - especially for Project Twist-It.

June Cigar is a formerly homeless person and human rights campaigner from Los Angeles, California. British animator & comedian, Howard Read created this EXCLUSIVE ANIMATION for Project Twist-It based on June’s story told in her own voice.

Voices of Experience

People living in poverty or struggling to get by often feel misrepresented and stigmatised by the media. In this short film, people with experience, interviewed by youngsters from the Reporters’ Academy, talk about the impact this has and what can be done to change it for the better. The film was made as part of a National Union of Journalists initiative to improve reporting of poverty.

 95-year-old  Harry Leslie Smith  grew up in poverty before serving in the RAF in the 2nd World War. He is a writer and anti-poverty advocate. He talks to Project Twist-It about the importance of telling our own stories about what its like to experience poverty and building a better future for the next generation.

95-year-old Harry Leslie Smith grew up in poverty before serving in the RAF in the 2nd World War. He is a writer and anti-poverty advocate. He talks to Project Twist-It about the importance of telling our own stories about what its like to experience poverty and building a better future for the next generation.

PROJECT TWIST-IT FILM


WATCH: YOUNG PEOPLE EXPLORING THE POVERTY STIGMA

Featuring Billie JD Porter (BBC, Channel 4) and produced in partnership with ThinkNation, this 15 minute film focuses on young people from across the UK as they share stories and insight on poverty, highlighting their ideas on how we can all change the narrative.

dispatches:  The latest from project twist-it

WATCH: project Twist-it founder MAry O’Hara discuss the impetus behind it

Lizzie Hodgson of ThinkNation devotes an episode of Triple Think to finding out all about Project Twist-It. Watch to find out more about the content PTI has been producing, what we’re learning, and the exciting activity coming in the months ahead.

WATCH: Filmmaker Wale Shittu, London

Wale Shittu is a young filmmaker from London. Watch the short film he made with collaborators, David Sanni, Omar Dick and Renike Oketunji exploring life on council estates challenging stereotypes.

 Filmmaker Wale Shittu

Filmmaker Wale Shittu

Filmmaker Wale Shittu, London

When Wale Shittu returned to the council estate he grew up in after graduating from university he wanted to find a creative way to bridge the gap in understanding between people who shared his life experience and those who did not. Listen to him talk about how harnessing storytelling can open minds and pave a way for young people to pursue their dreams.

WATCH: Musician, songwriter & 2018 Mercury music award nominee Nadine Shah, London

In this short film Nadine describes what she's learned about building a better future from working with young people, and why artists and musicians can be a positive force for fighting poverty. "I'm a great believer in one person or a small group of people making a difference." Nadine Shah, April 2018